America used to do great things.  It used to think big.  It used to aim for the stars.

John F. Kennedy challenged NASA to put a man on the moon and bring him home alive before the end of the 1960s.  On July 20, 1969, NASA accomplished just that when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the moon for the first time in human history.  An astronaut has not been back since 1972.

While growing up in the 1990s and early 2000s, I used to think America could do anything.  After all, we built the greatest economic system known to man, raised median household incomes to heights the world once thought unimaginable, cured numerous deadly diseases, assembled the strongest military on the face of the planet,  and made incredible technological advances.

But today, I sit here with an advanced degree, underemployed, and willing to work.  I am a member of the “me” generation that so many of the baby boomers pejoratively call us.  Self-righteous, arrogant, and unrealistic are some of the many adjectives used to describe Generation Y in blogs, articles, and stories from the Huffington Post to the New York Times.  I grew up, as many of my peers did, in a family that told me to shoot for the stars and chase my dreams.  I was told if I worked hard and didn’t get into trouble, then everything would be all right.

As 2013 draws to an end, America sees itself in the aftermath of the second worst economic recession in history.  And even though five years have elapsed since the 2008 financial crash, not one greedy Wall Street executive has been punished criminally for the reckless and grossly negligent actions that created the recession in the first place.  America’s debt is over $16 trillion, healthcare is a complete mess, our government just shutdown recently for 16 days, and it is one of the most partisan and divisive times in American political history.  Yet the baby boomers wonder why my generation is so frustrated.  Is it really that hard to figure out?  For once in American history, Generation Y is projected to have a worse standard of living than their parents.

Thank you for the debt.

The idea behind this blog / website is to inform the masses from my generation, the generations before me, and the generations that follow.  I hope to inspire people to question the world around them, to reach for the stars (even if you’re called an unrealistic yuppie in the process), to strive toward equality and fairness for all, and to pressure America to become the greatest country in the world once again.

I believe that it is every generation’s duty to push the human race forward; to advance civil society to the next stage; to increase the quality of life for ALL human beings; and to cultivate virtuous citizens of the world.

And for God’s sake, can we please put a man (or woman) on Mars already?

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3 Comments »

  1. Read Ray Bradbury’s Martian Chronicles….politicians will screw up Mars just like they screwed up Earth. I don’t think ventures to Mars are cost effective.

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  2. Act of 1871, The establishment of the District of Columbia, is what happened to America (Acts of the Forty-first Congress,” Section 34, Session III, chapters 61 and 62).

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